Councilmember Motion to Re-establish Eastside Biomedical Corridor Moves forward

Councilmember Motion to Re-establish Eastside Biomedical Corridor Moves forward

A motion introduced by Councilmember Huizar on September 19th to re-establish a comprehensive plan to create a Biomedical Corridor in the Boyle Heights, El Sereno area moved through the City’s Planning & Land Use Management Committee (PLUM) today, which Huizar Chairs

LOS ANGELES (Sept. 30, 2014) — A motion introduced by Councilmember Huizar on September 19th to re-establish a comprehensive plan to create a Biomedical Corridor in the Boyle Heights, El Sereno area moved through the City’s Planning & Land Use Management Committee (PLUM) today, which Huizar Chairs.

The Councilmember’s motion seeks to re-establish a plan first proposed by the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency to establish a “biomedical technology corridor.” The plan would allow for comprehensive planning of the entire area encompassing the LAC+USC Medical Center and USC Health Sciences Campus and California State University, Los Angeles. It also asks the City to look at land-use policy and economic incentives aimed at attracting long-term commitments from medical and bio-tech industries.

“There is incredible potential to build a successful biomedical technology corridor in the Boyle Heights, El Sereno areas of the City that creates thousands of jobs, pumps money into our local economy and uplifts our local communities,” said Councilmember José Huizar. “To ensure that the plan has long-term viability, we need to bring together all stakeholders and experts to create a comprehensive plan and that’s what my motion calls for.”

In 2009, when the CRA sought to combine two existing Redevelopment Project Areas, the City’s Adelante Eastside Redevelopment Plan and the Los Angeles County Whiteside Redevelopment Project,  it was estimated that the merging plans could generate $1.3 billion to the local economy, with 10,000 construction jobs, 8,500 permanent local jobs and 15,700 permanent jobs though the greater Los Angeles region. That plan fell away when the LACRA was disbanded by the state.

In PLUM today, Councilmember Huizar pointed out that the proposed plan is home to leading research facilities run by two accomplished local universities, USC and Cal State LA. Additionally, the USC/County Medical Center Master Plan aims to expand the campus into a community-accessible hub integrating local business opportunities, education and research facilities, wellness programming and healthcare.

Councilmember Huizar also asked today that the City seek feedback from the LA 32 Neighborhood Council; University Village Neighborhood Watch; the Hillside Village Neighborhood Watch; the Concerned Neighbors El Sereno; the El Sereno Chamber of Commerce; Cal State L.A.; USC and Grifols.

The existing cluster of bioscience research, education and wellness facilities in the area represent a strong and growing sector of Los Angeles’ economy. Nearby are large sections of underused, historically industrial parcels of land that are suitable for redevelopment due to their proximity to the medical facilities.

These assets provides a competitive advantage over other cities.

The County is also providing seed money to attract small, biomedical start-up companies to the area. Huizar’s plan would create stable and long-term infrastructure so that start-up companies, as well as established companies, can be successful decades into the future.

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Councilmember Motion to Re-establish Eastside Biomedical Corridor Moves forward

A motion introduced by Councilmember Huizar on September 19th to re-establish a comprehensive plan to create a Biomedical Corridor in the Boyle Heights, El Sereno area moved through the City’s Planning & Land Use Management Committee (PLUM) today, which Huizar Chairs

LOS ANGELES (Sept. 30, 2014) — A motion introduced by Councilmember Huizar on September 19th to re-establish a comprehensive plan to create a Biomedical Corridor in the Boyle Heights, El Sereno area moved through the City’s Planning & Land Use Management Committee (PLUM) today, which Huizar Chairs.

The Councilmember’s motion seeks to re-establish a plan first proposed by the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency to establish a “biomedical technology corridor.” The plan would allow for comprehensive planning of the entire area encompassing the LAC+USC Medical Center and USC Health Sciences Campus and California State University, Los Angeles. It also asks the City to look at land-use policy and economic incentives aimed at attracting long-term commitments from medical and bio-tech industries.

“There is incredible potential to build a successful biomedical technology corridor in the Boyle Heights, El Sereno areas of the City that creates thousands of jobs, pumps money into our local economy and uplifts our local communities,” said Councilmember José Huizar. “To ensure that the plan has long-term viability, we need to bring together all stakeholders and experts to create a comprehensive plan and that’s what my motion calls for.”

In 2009, when the CRA sought to combine two existing Redevelopment Project Areas, the City’s Adelante Eastside Redevelopment Plan and the Los Angeles County Whiteside Redevelopment Project,  it was estimated that the merging plans could generate $1.3 billion to the local economy, with 10,000 construction jobs, 8,500 permanent local jobs and 15,700 permanent jobs though the greater Los Angeles region. That plan fell away when the LACRA was disbanded by the state.

In PLUM today, Councilmember Huizar pointed out that the proposed plan is home to leading research facilities run by two accomplished local universities, USC and Cal State LA. Additionally, the USC/County Medical Center Master Plan aims to expand the campus into a community-accessible hub integrating local business opportunities, education and research facilities, wellness programming and healthcare.

Councilmember Huizar also asked today that the City seek feedback from the LA 32 Neighborhood Council; University Village Neighborhood Watch; the Hillside Village Neighborhood Watch; the Concerned Neighbors El Sereno; the El Sereno Chamber of Commerce; Cal State L.A.; USC and Grifols.

The existing cluster of bioscience research, education and wellness facilities in the area represent a strong and growing sector of Los Angeles’ economy. Nearby are large sections of underused, historically industrial parcels of land that are suitable for redevelopment due to their proximity to the medical facilities.

These assets provides a competitive advantage over other cities.

The County is also providing seed money to attract small, biomedical start-up companies to the area. Huizar’s plan would create stable and long-term infrastructure so that start-up companies, as well as established companies, can be successful decades into the future.

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