Huizar, LADOT’s Reynolds, Mayor’s Office Highlight Los Angeles St. Safety Improvements

Huizar, LADOT’s Reynolds, Mayor’s Office Highlight Los Angeles St. Safety Improvements

Los Angeles St. ribbon cutting showcased newly installed protected bike lanes featuring City’s first ‘bicycle-only traffic signals,’ new transit platforms for bus riders, as well as street and crosswalk upgrades – ceremony ended with ‘ride-off’ on Metro bikeshare bicycle


Councilmember José Huizar joined Thursday with LADOT’s General Manager Seleta Reynolds, the Mayor’s office and the Public Works Commission for a ribbon-cutting highlighting newly installed Los Angeles Street Safety Improvements in DTLA. The approximately $775,000 project, paid for with State of California Transportation Development Act funds, includes protected bike lanes along Los Angeles Street (north and south) from Alameda to First Street, four of the City’s first “bicycle-only traffic signals,” new transit platforms for bus riders, and street resurfacing and striping, including new crosswalks.

13465964_10103576135387864_1638762711543054750_n.jpg

Huizar, Deputy Mayor Barbara Romero, Public Works Commission President Kevin James Reynolds, and Bureau of Street Services Director Nazario Saucedo, ended the ribbon cutting with a “ride-off” on official Metro Bike Share bicycles on the newly installed protected bike lanes.

The LADOT effort is part of Mayor Garcetti’s Vision Zero Plan and Councilmember Huizar’s DTLA Forward initiative. Vision Zero aims to increase pedestrian and bicyclists’ safety as part of a larger initiative to eliminate traffic deaths by 2025. DTLA Forward is focused on adding and improving public spaces, as well as pedestrian and bicycle access in Downtown Los Angeles.

“L.A.’s transportation future depends on providing new options for getting around our region, and making our streets safer and more appealing for everyone who uses them,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “The new improvements to Los Angeles Street hit all those marks, and they're an example of the kind of upgrades we are bringing citywide.”

The Los Angeles Street Bicycle improvements include bicyclist traffic signals at Arcadia, Aliso and Temple streets and follow Huizar, LADOT’s Reynolds and Metro officials celebrating in March the City’s first pedestrian Head Start Signals in Downtown Los Angeles, where pedestrians now enjoy a four-second head start in entering 16 crosswalks throughout DTLA, creating safer conditions and higher pedestrian visibility.

“To meet the multimodal transportation needs of the future, the City of Los Angeles needs to be innovative and creative in its approach,” said Councilmember Huizar. “This program meets that standard and is one of many Council District 14 pilot projects that allow us to prioritize bicycle, pedestrian and public-transit users as much as automobiles. At their core, Vision Zero and DTLA Forward are about improving safe access to the public realm for all Angelenos and I applaud all our partners who worked with us on the Los Angeles Street improvements.”

As part of the Los Angeles Street upgrades, transit bus station platforms are now located in the street between the protected bike lane and first lane of traffic. These slightly elevated concrete bus station platforms enable transit riders to have direct access to the bus, are ADA compliant, and enable buses to pick-up and drop-off passengers without blocking the protected bike lanes installed on either side of Los Angeles Street.

“The Department of Public Works is committed to designing, building and maintaining projects that improve quality of life for all LA residents, and we are leading the way when it comes to investing in our public infrastructure in Los Angeles,” said Commissioner Kevin James.

LADOT worked with the Bureau of Street Services to implement all the upgrades on the street and have been working with the Mayor, Huizar and other elected officials to bring more pedestrian, bike-friendly and public-transit improvements to the City.

"Our namesake street should be a place where people can easily walk, bike, take the bus, and drive, no matter their age or ability,” said Seleta Reynolds, LADOT General Manager. “This street connects our civic home at City Hall to our historic home at El Pueblo and Union Station. Our interest is to reintroduce people to the joy of seeing downtown from a different perspective and to deliver a safe, organized, and beautiful street.”

Huizar, LADOT’s Reynolds, Mayor’s Office Highlight Los Angeles St. Safety Improvements

Los Angeles St. ribbon cutting showcased newly installed protected bike lanes featuring City’s first ‘bicycle-only traffic signals,’ new transit platforms for bus riders, as well as street and crosswalk upgrades – ceremony ended with ‘ride-off’ on Metro bikeshare bicycle


Councilmember José Huizar joined Thursday with LADOT’s General Manager Seleta Reynolds, the Mayor’s office and the Public Works Commission for a ribbon-cutting highlighting newly installed Los Angeles Street Safety Improvements in DTLA. The approximately $775,000 project, paid for with State of California Transportation Development Act funds, includes protected bike lanes along Los Angeles Street (north and south) from Alameda to First Street, four of the City’s first “bicycle-only traffic signals,” new transit platforms for bus riders, and street resurfacing and striping, including new crosswalks.

13465964_10103576135387864_1638762711543054750_n.jpg

Huizar, Deputy Mayor Barbara Romero, Public Works Commission President Kevin James Reynolds, and Bureau of Street Services Director Nazario Saucedo, ended the ribbon cutting with a “ride-off” on official Metro Bike Share bicycles on the newly installed protected bike lanes.

The LADOT effort is part of Mayor Garcetti’s Vision Zero Plan and Councilmember Huizar’s DTLA Forward initiative. Vision Zero aims to increase pedestrian and bicyclists’ safety as part of a larger initiative to eliminate traffic deaths by 2025. DTLA Forward is focused on adding and improving public spaces, as well as pedestrian and bicycle access in Downtown Los Angeles.

“L.A.’s transportation future depends on providing new options for getting around our region, and making our streets safer and more appealing for everyone who uses them,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “The new improvements to Los Angeles Street hit all those marks, and they're an example of the kind of upgrades we are bringing citywide.”

The Los Angeles Street Bicycle improvements include bicyclist traffic signals at Arcadia, Aliso and Temple streets and follow Huizar, LADOT’s Reynolds and Metro officials celebrating in March the City’s first pedestrian Head Start Signals in Downtown Los Angeles, where pedestrians now enjoy a four-second head start in entering 16 crosswalks throughout DTLA, creating safer conditions and higher pedestrian visibility.

“To meet the multimodal transportation needs of the future, the City of Los Angeles needs to be innovative and creative in its approach,” said Councilmember Huizar. “This program meets that standard and is one of many Council District 14 pilot projects that allow us to prioritize bicycle, pedestrian and public-transit users as much as automobiles. At their core, Vision Zero and DTLA Forward are about improving safe access to the public realm for all Angelenos and I applaud all our partners who worked with us on the Los Angeles Street improvements.”

As part of the Los Angeles Street upgrades, transit bus station platforms are now located in the street between the protected bike lane and first lane of traffic. These slightly elevated concrete bus station platforms enable transit riders to have direct access to the bus, are ADA compliant, and enable buses to pick-up and drop-off passengers without blocking the protected bike lanes installed on either side of Los Angeles Street.

“The Department of Public Works is committed to designing, building and maintaining projects that improve quality of life for all LA residents, and we are leading the way when it comes to investing in our public infrastructure in Los Angeles,” said Commissioner Kevin James.

LADOT worked with the Bureau of Street Services to implement all the upgrades on the street and have been working with the Mayor, Huizar and other elected officials to bring more pedestrian, bike-friendly and public-transit improvements to the City.

"Our namesake street should be a place where people can easily walk, bike, take the bus, and drive, no matter their age or ability,” said Seleta Reynolds, LADOT General Manager. “This street connects our civic home at City Hall to our historic home at El Pueblo and Union Station. Our interest is to reintroduce people to the joy of seeing downtown from a different perspective and to deliver a safe, organized, and beautiful street.”

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