Transit Oriented Communities Guidelines Released

Transit Oriented Communities Guidelines Released

Last year, Angelenos voted in support of Measure JJJ. Part of that measures aims to create a Transit Oriented Communities Affordable Housing Incentive (TOC) Program. TOC establishes new incentives to facilitate the development of mixed-income and affordable housing located within a half-mile of a major transit stop. A major transit stop is an existing rail transit station, a rail transit station currently under construction or the intersection of two or more bus routes with peak service levels of 15 minutes or less. On Friday, Councilmember Huizar, along with Mayor Eric Garcetti and City Planning Director Vince Bertoni announced the release of the final guidelines. 


 

City Releases Measure JJJ Guidelines for Transit-Based Affordable Housing Incentive Program

Mayor Eric Garcetti, Councilmember José Huizar, and City Planning Director Vince Bertoni announced the release of City Planning’s final guidelines today for the Transit Oriented Communities (TOC) Affordable Housing Incentive Program. The TOC Guidelines launch a new incentive-based program for housing production, as required by Measure JJJ.

 

In November of 2016, City of Los Angeles voters overwhelmingly adopted Measure JJJ, which instructed City Planning to create an optional affordable housing incentive program to promote the construction of new housing. The program specifies that a project must dedicate a percentage of affordable, on-site units in exchange for development incentives.

 

“Voters sent us a clear and resounding message last November: end the crushing affordability crisis,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “Measure JJJ gives us a tool to do exactly that. The TOC program will help us build sustainable, inclusive housing along our growing transit network — so more Angelenos can wake up in safe and affordable homes, catch a train nearby, and get where they’re going on time.”

 

"Zoning and housing production are linked at the core, and with our desperate need for more affordable housing, the incentives contained in the updated TOC program, which are mandated by the voters, puts more density around public transit where it makes sense," said Councilmember Jose Huizar, Chair of the Planning Land Use & Management Committee. "Along with other recent actions we've taken to increase affordable housing for all Angelenos, we can look forward to a more vibrant, livable and sustainable Los Angeles."

 

“The City’s TOC program encourages housing around transit-rich communities as a way to grow sustainably, advance housing affordability, and maximize the region’s investment in our transit infrastructure,” said Vince Bertoni, Director of the Department of City Planning. “As a result of Measure JJJ, this program will serve as a meaningful tool to address our housing crisis.”

 

The City Planning Department prepared TOC Guidelines which will create a new system of incentives for residential projects meeting certain affordable housing requirements and are located within one-half mile of a major transit stop. The incentives are tiered based on the proximity to specific types of transit stops with projects receiving development incentives similar to the State’s Density Bonus, which establishes a set of limited base incentives which do not require project-level City Planning approval and a menu of additional incentives obtained through a discretionary City Planning review process.

 

The tiered-based system allows for higher incentives to apply to projects that are 100% affordable or closest to high-quality transit areas – aligning with the City’s General Plan policies, which promote housing around transit infrastructure. Qualifying projects receive additional density or floor area ratio (FAR) to facilitate the construction of additional affordable units – up to 80% in density or 55% in FAR – in order to incentivize the construction of affordable housing as part of new market-rate development.

Prior to drafting the TOC guidelines, City Planning staff met with neighborhood councils, business organizations, architects, and developers to receive input. The City Planning Commission reviewed the program at its May 25th meeting and provided recommendations to the Director of City Planning, who released the final guidelines today.

 

According to Measure JJJ, the program runs for ten years, with the opportunity for City Council to extend for an additional five years. The TOC Guidelines for a particular area may also be tailored to the Community Plan level through City Planning’s ongoing Community Plan Update program, provided that the affordable housing requirements of Measure JJJ are met.

For more information on TOC incentives and eligibility, go to planning.lacity.org.

 

Transit Oriented Communities Guidelines Released

Last year, Angelenos voted in support of Measure JJJ. Part of that measures aims to create a Transit Oriented Communities Affordable Housing Incentive (TOC) Program. TOC establishes new incentives to facilitate the development of mixed-income and affordable housing located within a half-mile of a major transit stop. A major transit stop is an existing rail transit station, a rail transit station currently under construction or the intersection of two or more bus routes with peak service levels of 15 minutes or less. On Friday, Councilmember Huizar, along with Mayor Eric Garcetti and City Planning Director Vince Bertoni announced the release of the final guidelines. 


 

City Releases Measure JJJ Guidelines for Transit-Based Affordable Housing Incentive Program

Mayor Eric Garcetti, Councilmember José Huizar, and City Planning Director Vince Bertoni announced the release of City Planning’s final guidelines today for the Transit Oriented Communities (TOC) Affordable Housing Incentive Program. The TOC Guidelines launch a new incentive-based program for housing production, as required by Measure JJJ.

 

In November of 2016, City of Los Angeles voters overwhelmingly adopted Measure JJJ, which instructed City Planning to create an optional affordable housing incentive program to promote the construction of new housing. The program specifies that a project must dedicate a percentage of affordable, on-site units in exchange for development incentives.

 

“Voters sent us a clear and resounding message last November: end the crushing affordability crisis,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti. “Measure JJJ gives us a tool to do exactly that. The TOC program will help us build sustainable, inclusive housing along our growing transit network — so more Angelenos can wake up in safe and affordable homes, catch a train nearby, and get where they’re going on time.”

 

"Zoning and housing production are linked at the core, and with our desperate need for more affordable housing, the incentives contained in the updated TOC program, which are mandated by the voters, puts more density around public transit where it makes sense," said Councilmember Jose Huizar, Chair of the Planning Land Use & Management Committee. "Along with other recent actions we've taken to increase affordable housing for all Angelenos, we can look forward to a more vibrant, livable and sustainable Los Angeles."

 

“The City’s TOC program encourages housing around transit-rich communities as a way to grow sustainably, advance housing affordability, and maximize the region’s investment in our transit infrastructure,” said Vince Bertoni, Director of the Department of City Planning. “As a result of Measure JJJ, this program will serve as a meaningful tool to address our housing crisis.”

 

The City Planning Department prepared TOC Guidelines which will create a new system of incentives for residential projects meeting certain affordable housing requirements and are located within one-half mile of a major transit stop. The incentives are tiered based on the proximity to specific types of transit stops with projects receiving development incentives similar to the State’s Density Bonus, which establishes a set of limited base incentives which do not require project-level City Planning approval and a menu of additional incentives obtained through a discretionary City Planning review process.

 

The tiered-based system allows for higher incentives to apply to projects that are 100% affordable or closest to high-quality transit areas – aligning with the City’s General Plan policies, which promote housing around transit infrastructure. Qualifying projects receive additional density or floor area ratio (FAR) to facilitate the construction of additional affordable units – up to 80% in density or 55% in FAR – in order to incentivize the construction of affordable housing as part of new market-rate development.

Prior to drafting the TOC guidelines, City Planning staff met with neighborhood councils, business organizations, architects, and developers to receive input. The City Planning Commission reviewed the program at its May 25th meeting and provided recommendations to the Director of City Planning, who released the final guidelines today.

 

According to Measure JJJ, the program runs for ten years, with the opportunity for City Council to extend for an additional five years. The TOC Guidelines for a particular area may also be tailored to the Community Plan level through City Planning’s ongoing Community Plan Update program, provided that the affordable housing requirements of Measure JJJ are met.

For more information on TOC incentives and eligibility, go to planning.lacity.org.

 

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